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The Malay Archipelago adalah sebuah buku yang ditulis oleh seorang naturalis berkebangsaan Inggris, Alfred Russel Wallace yang berisikan petualangan.
Table of contents

The author structured the books to take the reader from island to island, much like the author himself travelled, telling of the islands' geographies, human populations, the volcanoes, plants and animals. In between we also learn of the difficulties such journeys pose, the threats, and how he was helped several times by all kinds of people, indiginous and otherwise.

The last few chapters of this volume are dedicated to birds of paradise and the races of man. Apart from the amicable writing style, I noticed that Wallace was a bit different from other naturalists of his time by not describing himself as being very adventurous. Weird for a guy who travelled from island to island for 8 years. He seems to have been self-confident but not arrogant you know, in a British colonial sort of way. And I loved that he only believed in what he could see for himself and examine which probably explains his meticulousness.

I must admit that I found these books by coincidence and that I hadn't known about this man before despite him being one of the co-discoverers of natural selection and him obviously having been an influence on other, perhaps more well-known, naturalists and later scientists!

There is for example the Wallace-Line, a faunal boundary he drew in it was named later by the English biologist Thomas Henry Huxley that separates the ecozones of Asia and Wallacea, a transitional zone between Asia and Australia. Or the Wallace-Effect, which is a process of speciation also known as reinforcement where natural selection increases the reproductive isolation between two populations of species as a result of selection acting against the production of hybrid individuals as those would be less fit. While the modern concept originates from another scientist, Wallace did lay the foundation.

As you can see, the man was important for our modern understanding of the natural world, evolution and geology and I'm glad I found this gorgeous edition of his journals yes, the design is what made me buy them and that I was thus able to complete my own journey through natural history and the voyages of discovery from around that time by also having read this meticulous man's journals.

The Malay Archipelago was an instant and resounding success and has since been republished and translated many times. Hundreds of footnotes point out factual errors, provide explanations for inconsistencies, add more detail to illuminate certain points, provide context for certain sections and give common names for species of animals, insects and plants. The book is beautifully produced with a mid-section of color drawings that depict animals, birds, insects and flowers. Dotted through the chapters are new charcoal sketches of exotic birds, animals, indigenous people and significant places.

We are treated to his thoughts, impressions, experiments, findings and analysis of scientific data on what he saw, experienced and collected during his wanderings. From a very modest background, Wallace survived by selling his specimens to museums in Britain—but he was no mercenary. His love for travel and commitment to the study of nature are revealed in every chapter.

In the course of his trip over , creatures, insects, flowers, plants were collected, captured and studied by him and his team of assistants, most from indigenous populations. Of course, many birds and animals were shot and killed—the orang-utan being the most famous. Despite shooting dead its mother warning: there is little remorse for killing in the name of science he shows incredible compassion and affection for an injured and orphaned infant orang-utan: When handled or nursed, it was very quiet and contented, but when laid down by itself it would invariably cry.

The literary merit and page-turning qualities of his prose are evident at every turn.

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His writing is vivid and evocative, in particular, the extensive descriptions of the birds he caught, dissected or studied. On finding a new species of the famous Bird of Paradise, beautifully illustrated in this edition, Wallace writes: The general plumage is very sober, being a pure ashy olive with a purplish tinge on the back; the crown of the head is beautifully glossed with a pale metallic violet and the feathers at the front extend as much over the beak as in the rest of the family.

Seemingly incongruous with what has come before, these sections are nevertheless important because they define his views on the clear racial and cultural differences between the Malay and Polynesian peoples, i. But he was of course a man of his era and the terminology he used needs to be viewed in the light of more respectful comments on the native populations. In one of more profound moments of philosophical insight in The Malay Archipelago, Wallace praises the law-free yet peace-loving societies he comes across all over the region and contrasts them favourably against Victorian Britain, with its growing socio-economic problems.

Perhaps intending to criticise European society more than to proclaim the superiority of the people he met on his travels, Wallace writes In such a community, all are nearly equal. There are none of those wide distinctions, of education and ignorance, wealth and poverty, master and servant which are the product of our civilization. Those interested in expanding their knowledge of natural sciences, including students and others already aware of Wallace, will find this edition rewarding. View all 4 comments. Nov 05, Andrew added it Shelves: environmental-nonfiction , travel-nonfiction.

Oh, to be a 19th Century man of science and discovery! To drink bitters and claret upon a ship with a name like the "HMS Gallant" and smoke a pipe of finest Virginia 'pon the sands as your Balinese boys fetch you a cocoa-nut for an evening repast. As someone who was raised on a steady diet of Indiana Jones and Sherlock Holmes, I need no convincing. And Wallace is rapturous about everything he comes into contact with. Whether he's writing about the virtues of breadfruit, the plumage of a tropical Oh, to be a 19th Century man of science and discovery!

Whether he's writing about the virtues of breadfruit, the plumage of a tropical bird, or how he beat an orangutan too severely this time, he's a compassionate and witty observer, and also faintly ridiculous. Of course, a lot of Goodreads reviewers are going to comment on Wallace's racism. To be fair, while he comes off as a haughty Victorian imperialist nowadays yeah, those Malays need to be in perennial debt to coffee planters so they can develop a work ethic! View all 3 comments. Surely I would learn much of use, but can't be doing with all this 'higher races' business, tedious travel details etc in laborious C19th style for pages.

Life is too short! Do not read the Stanfords Travel Classics edition. One of the few books I've ever read where the typographical errors detract from the sense and the enjoyment of the narrative. Natives in brass huts! Canoes on the peaches! In fact, the publisher's negligence suggests ethical and intellectual failings bordering on criminal. Obviously this series is a scam which attempts to use auto Do not read the Stanfords Travel Classics edition.

Obviously this series is a scam which attempts to use automated character recognition and a spell-checker to make an easy buck from unsuspecting readers. Otherwise a fascinating artifact of one of Victorian England's most important field naturalists. You may cringe as he slaughters orangutans for Science!

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The Malay Archipelago by Alfred Russel Wallace - Penguin Books Australia

Not to mention the ultimate 3-page rant on the moral inferiority of "civilized" vs. I'd give Wallace's material -- to the extent I could judge -- stars. The nocturnal sailboat expedition in comet-light is worth the effort by itself. And I'll be looking for a facsimile edition. I recommend this book. Find an edition with the original figures. Find an edition that's been proofread. With eight years of travel around the islands of Indonesia to condense into one volume there was bound to be some repetition, and at points I did feel a certain ennui when a pattern established itself of "travel to island, meet head man, arrange house, go collecting, prepare collections, fight predations of insects upon collection, become dissatisfied with range of wildlife, leave island'.

But though it did have aspects of this it is a book of such broad scope and I can see how Wallace wanted to With eight years of travel around the islands of Indonesia to condense into one volume there was bound to be some repetition, and at points I did feel a certain ennui when a pattern established itself of "travel to island, meet head man, arrange house, go collecting, prepare collections, fight predations of insects upon collection, become dissatisfied with range of wildlife, leave island'.

But though it did have aspects of this it is a book of such broad scope and I can see how Wallace wanted to cover every aspect of the region that he could, that you can forgive these small difficulties upon the reader. This was the period when evolution, geology and other sciences were being worked out and it is fascinating to see these new ideas taking shape in the pages of Wallace's book. He also demonstrates the oddities of the Victorian mindset; both regarding the indigenous people as 'savages' and primitive, yet at the same time feeling that they are somehow presenting a far more enlightened civilisation than that of the western world.

A fascinating book, for certain. Dec 14, Pras rated it it was amazing. Better than The origin of species. This has been permanently shelved for the time being. A brief note: from what I read, one of the more interesting aspects were the pure imperial aspects and different attitudes of the time. This man was, in as much as we could say of that era, a naturalist. Yet, the way he enacted this was more or less to kill any interesting animal he saw and preserve it for science.

Biodiversity and human livelihood crises in the Malay Archipelago.

I had a hard time stomaching the massacres of orangutans, the orphanage of a baby, which he attempted to feed on coconut milk, an This has been permanently shelved for the time being. I had a hard time stomaching the massacres of orangutans, the orphanage of a baby, which he attempted to feed on coconut milk, and which subsequently starved to death.

Herein lies the question, what is best for the environment. Unquestionably, this man's methods seem contrary to the preservation of animal life, but the knowledge he brought to the western world through the preservation of the dead specimens would eventually help to bring recognition of the amazing ecological diversity of lands outside their own, and the need to preserve them. BUT, would these places and their creatures be in danger at all if not for the spread of imperialism and western culture, which promotes intensive agriculture for export and convinces people of a need to live a very inefficient and wasteful lifestyle?

Who is to say again that those very same people would eventually not develop these things on their own? So many questions. In one of David Attenborough's videos on youtube, he is reflecting on the things he has just seen, and then pulls out this book and proceeds to read from it. Apparently this was also Conrad's "Bedside Companion," and Wallace, who wrote it, proposed a theory of natural selection in a letter to Darwin only a short while before Darwin himself was to publish "On the Origin of Species.

Alfred Russel Wallace's account of his travels and observations in what is today Indonesia and that occurred mostly in , the year that he and Darwin published on the Theory of Evolution. Wallace describes his adventures visiting the many islands in the archipelago and his constant search for and preparation of bird and insect specimens that he sent back to England and with which he supported himself.

At one point he comments that he is the only white person residing on the thousand-mile Alfred Russel Wallace's account of his travels and observations in what is today Indonesia and that occurred mostly in , the year that he and Darwin published on the Theory of Evolution. At one point he comments that he is the only white person residing on the thousand-mile-long island of New Guinea, where he is primarily interested in finding new examples of the Bird of Paradise. His description of hunting the Orang-Utan is especially disturbing in light of its recent endangerment.

Wallace discusses the biogeography of the archipelago at length including the faunal divide that would later be called the Wallace Line. He also discusses the people of the islands at length, frequently comparing the Malay and Papuan "races" and their degrees of civilization or barbarity.

This Victorian view of humanity is sometimes trying, although Wallace makes several comments admiring the noble savages around him who live in peace and harmony without any of the oppressive social structures that are necessary at home. Later in life he became a social activist supporting women's suffrage and opposing eugenics, the destruction of the environment by human activity, and militarism. The Folio Society edition of this book has beautiful color plates with drawings by the author and some photographs.

May 27, Nancy rated it it was amazing. Alfred Russel Wallace is the man who simultaneously to Darwin came up with the theory of evolution by natural selection. Wallace had no college degree and came from a poor English family, unlike Darwin, and he deferred to Darwin and gave Darwin credit for the theory throughout his life.

The Malay Archipelago chronicles Wallace's eight years exploring and documenting the natural history of southeast Asia from Singapore through Indonesia and to Papua New Guinea. Of strong constitution, unlike Darw Alfred Russel Wallace is the man who simultaneously to Darwin came up with the theory of evolution by natural selection. Of strong constitution, unlike Darwin, he withstands malaria, dengue fever, being stuck at sea for weeks at a time, and near attacks by vipers and other creatures.

Everywhere he went, he quickly won over indigenous people with his quiet and friendly demeanor, while he amassed tremendous collections of species new to science for museums in England.

Read this book if you are interested in natural selection, biogeography, natural history, southeast Asian culture, and adventure. The addition of the common names and updated scientific names in the footnotes greatly help the reader with recognising the species, or even doing their own reading on it later.

The Malay Archipelago

A must-read if you are into natural history! View 1 comment. Wallace spent several years in the s and s killing and collecting specimens in what is now Indonesia and Malaysia for natural-history collections in Europe. He describes and discusses the plants and animals that he finds, how he came upon them, and aspects of their context, and he relates distribution of the species to his musings on geology and to the theory of natural selection, which he developed simultaneously to Charles Darwin.

In addition, Wallace expresses his fascination with the Wallace spent several years in the s and s killing and collecting specimens in what is now Indonesia and Malaysia for natural-history collections in Europe. In addition, Wallace expresses his fascination with the local "races," which he categorizes in a high-handed fashion, and with their technologies, which he describes in appreciative detail.

Finally, he relates his own adventures, which are numerous, and procedures, which are interesting. Drawings illustrate much of the text.

The Malay Archipelago: A dramatic tale of natural history

In present-day terms, this long, detailed classic reads much like a magnificent blog. Having spent much time in this area of the world I found it fascinating. He includes many descriptions of geography, tribal interaction, animal and plant life, as well as some history. The amount of detail he includes is staggering. His conclusions about whether or not the European has reached an advanced state over the tribal peoples he lived with were fascinating.

I really enjoyed much of the book. However pages describing the hundreds of different genus of beetle he discovered was a little too much for me. Sep 30, Emile Poelman rated it it was amazing. One of my favourites. A real classic of natural history and travel. Wallace, a contemporary of Charles Datwin, is my idea of real hero: wandering alone through treacherous rainforests of the Indonesian Archipelago, looking for rare species to send home Leeches and malaria around every corner And extremely well written.

Jan 09, Margaretha Quina rated it it was amazing. Wallace makes natural history really fun! A tour across our archipelago through the detailed, easy to read description within the book. Wallace is definitely a great writer; and it's amazing that he can achieve this level of detail with all the hurdles and difficulty in exploring all kinds of ecosystem Indonesia had to offer.

His talent in describing any species, including human race and his feelings, and his judgment to various race is very entertaining. A recommended reading to anyone who's Wallace makes natural history really fun! A recommended reading to anyone who's traveling Indonesia, or who want to simply explore the vast archipelago through papers and pages. Aug 26, Mike Panton rated it really liked it. I loved the bits of culture that I picked up from it. May 24, Michael rated it really liked it Shelves: people-and-biographies. What's surprising about this is that I read so little AND that I could've finished it so much quicker!

A mammoth journey.

Definitely worth reading. Just my type of thing; historical science and voyage. Such an epic tale. Nov 20, Christopher Condit rated it really liked it. A rip-roaring explorer adventure tale, non-fiction. Now I want to go to Sulawesi. It isn't Wallace's fault that he was a product of the 19th century, making parts of this book hard to read. I enjoyed his sense of wonder at discovery. I envy the naturalists of the 18th and 19th centuries, who never had to feel that all of this beauty would be going away. Sep 16, Serge rated it it was amazing. A fantastic book by a great scientist.

And the thrill of scientific discovery. Jan 08, Tippy Jackson rated it it was ok Shelves: animalia , abandoned , science-history , biogeography.

If you are interested in the area of biogeography explored by Wallace- I recommend "Song of the Dodo" by David Quammen instead. I was really disappointed with this and only got about pages into it. Sadly, the image I had in my head of Alfred Wallace has been shattered. Holiday type. Discover the difference See the world through our eyes as you travel with National Geographic.

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